2008-05-28 00:00:00: 2008-05-28 00:00:00:

Terry D. Etherton

It is hard to believe that two years have past since I launched the Terry Etherton Blog on Biotechnology and Terry Etherton’s Blog on Hormones, Biotechnology and Food Safety.

The driving force for the creation of these blogs was to provide a public forum for presenting science-based facts about numerous issues that broadly relate to the use of biotechnologies and technologies for food production. Given all the “stuff” that has been spewed out by opponents of science and biotechnology over the past two years, there is an ever greater need for scientists and concerned consumers to defend the role of science in society.

As I have written in my blogs, the anti-science activist groups are well organized and funded. Moreover, the scientific community continues to remain quiet.

Recently, the American Council on Science and Health presented the first Henry I. Miller Award for Excellence in Public Health Education to Dr. Henry Miller. This award was created to honor scientists who speak out on health and science issues. I applaud Dr. Miller and the American Council on Science and Health! I, too, encourage other scientists to come out of their classrooms and laboratories to take on those who distort science…the luddites who attack science and technological innovation.

For those of you who care about the scientific method and the discoveries made in laboratories, some of which become incredibly valuable products that benefit society, my encouragement is to become involved in the public discussion…to defend science and the right to use safe and beneficial products of biotechnology!

…on to Year 3!

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2008-05-28 00:00:00: 2008-05-28 00:00:00:

Terry D. Etherton

It is hard to believe that two years have past since I launched the Terry Etherton Blog on Biotechnology and Terry Etherton’s Blog on Hormones, Biotechnology and Food Safety.

The driving force for the creation of these blogs was to provide a public forum for presenting science-based facts about numerous issues that broadly relate to the use of biotechnologies and technologies for food production. Given all the “stuff” that has been spewed out by opponents of science and biotechnology over the past two years, there is an ever greater need for scientists and concerned consumers to defend the role of science in society.

As I have written in my blogs, the anti-science activist groups are well organized and funded. Moreover, the scientific community continues to remain quiet.

Recently, the American Council on Science and Health presented the first Henry I. Miller Award for Excellence in Public Health Education to Dr. Henry Miller. This award was created to honor scientists who speak out on health and science issues. I applaud Dr. Miller and the American Council on Science and Health! I, too, encourage other scientists to come out of their classrooms and laboratories to take on those who distort science…the luddites who attack science and technological innovation.

For those of you who care about the scientific method and the discoveries made in laboratories, some of which become incredibly valuable products that benefit society, my encouragement is to become involved in the public discussion…to defend science and the right to use safe and beneficial products of biotechnology!

…on to Year 3!

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Comments are closed.

2008-05-28 00:00:00: 2008-05-28 00:00:00:

Terry D. Etherton

It is hard to believe that two years have past since I launched the Terry Etherton Blog on Biotechnology and Terry Etherton’s Blog on Hormones, Biotechnology and Food Safety.

The driving force for the creation of these blogs was to provide a public forum for presenting science-based facts about numerous issues that broadly relate to the use of biotechnologies and technologies for food production. Given all the “stuff” that has been spewed out by opponents of science and biotechnology over the past two years, there is an ever greater need for scientists and concerned consumers to defend the role of science in society.

As I have written in my blogs, the anti-science activist groups are well organized and funded. Moreover, the scientific community continues to remain quiet.

Recently, the American Council on Science and Health presented the first Henry I. Miller Award for Excellence in Public Health Education to Dr. Henry Miller. This award was created to honor scientists who speak out on health and science issues. I applaud Dr. Miller and the American Council on Science and Health! I, too, encourage other scientists to come out of their classrooms and laboratories to take on those who distort science…the luddites who attack science and technological innovation.

For those of you who care about the scientific method and the discoveries made in laboratories, some of which become incredibly valuable products that benefit society, my encouragement is to become involved in the public discussion…to defend science and the right to use safe and beneficial products of biotechnology!

…on to Year 3!

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2008-01-31 00:00:00: 2008-01-31 00:00:00:


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2008-01-31 00:00:00: 2008-01-31 00:00:00:

Terry D. Etherton

Genetically engineered (GE) animals provide innovative technologies that can transform public health through biomedical, food and environmental applications, according to a scientific report released by the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO).

The report, Genetically Engineered Animals and Public Health – Compelling Benefits for Health Care, Nutrition, the Environment and Animal Welfare, discusses how GE animals will enhance human health, food production, environmental protection, animal health and cutting-edge industrial applications. The report was authored by Scott Gottlieb, MD, of the American Enterprise Institute, and Matthew B. Wheeler, PhD, of the Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Gottlieb and Dr. Wheeler are experts in the field of genetic engineering of animals.

Genetic engineering is the deliberate modification of the animal’s genome using the scientific tools of modern biotechnology. By incorporating genes from other organisms in a process called transgenesis, GE animals are being developed to address five broad goals:

  • Advance human health: GE animals will improve human health by producing novel replacement proteins, drugs, vaccines and tissues for the treatment and prevention of human disease.
  • Enhance food production and quality: Animals that are genetically engineered will have improved food production capabilities, enabling them to help meet the global demand for more efficient, higher quality and lower-cost sources of food.
  • Mitigate environmental impact: GE animals will contribute to improving the environment and human health by consuming fewer resources and producing less waste.
  • Optimize animal welfare. Genetic engineering offers tremendous benefits to the animals by enhancing the health, well-being and welfare of the animal itself.
  • Improve industrial products: Genetic engineering can produce high-value industrial products, such as spider silk, for both medical and defense applications.
  • “There are now dozens of products under development derived from genetically engineered animals that hold promise of benefit to human health,” says Dr. Gottlieb. “But the practical benefits of this technology have not yet reached American patients and consumers primarily because of regulatory and political obstacles rather than the limits of science.”

    The authors make a strong case for creating a regulatory pathway for commercialization of these beneficial biotechnologies. The Bio Report illustrates how the production of GE animals promises benefits for both biomedicine and agriculture. But Gottlieb and Wheeler agree that the science requires regulations that bridge the divide between food and biomedical products.

    I have written extensively about the importance of biotechnology in the Terry Etherton Blog on Biotechnology. The BIO Report, Genetically Engineered Animals and Public Health – Compelling Benefits for Health Care, Nutrition, the Environment and Animal Welfare, reinforces the need for and value of biotechnology in society. The numerous benefits of of GE animals only can be realized when policy obstacles are resolved that are limiting investment in this research and holding back product development.

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    2008-01-31 00:00:00: 2008-01-31 00:00:00:


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    2008-01-31 00:00:00: 2008-01-31 00:00:00:

    Terry D. Etherton

    Genetically engineered (GE) animals provide innovative technologies that can transform public health through biomedical, food and environmental applications, according to a scientific report released by the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO).

    The report, Genetically Engineered Animals and Public Health – Compelling Benefits for Health Care, Nutrition, the Environment and Animal Welfare, discusses how GE animals will enhance human health, food production, environmental protection, animal health and cutting-edge industrial applications. The report was authored by Scott Gottlieb, MD, of the American Enterprise Institute, and Matthew B. Wheeler, PhD, of the Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Gottlieb and Dr. Wheeler are experts in the field of genetic engineering of animals.

    Genetic engineering is the deliberate modification of the animal’s genome using the scientific tools of modern biotechnology. By incorporating genes from other organisms in a process called transgenesis, GE animals are being developed to address five broad goals:

  • Advance human health: GE animals will improve human health by producing novel replacement proteins, drugs, vaccines and tissues for the treatment and prevention of human disease.
  • Enhance food production and quality: Animals that are genetically engineered will have improved food production capabilities, enabling them to help meet the global demand for more efficient, higher quality and lower-cost sources of food.
  • Mitigate environmental impact: GE animals will contribute to improving the environment and human health by consuming fewer resources and producing less waste.
  • Optimize animal welfare. Genetic engineering offers tremendous benefits to the animals by enhancing the health, well-being and welfare of the animal itself.
  • Improve industrial products: Genetic engineering can produce high-value industrial products, such as spider silk, for both medical and defense applications.
  • “There are now dozens of products under development derived from genetically engineered animals that hold promise of benefit to human health,” says Dr. Gottlieb. “But the practical benefits of this technology have not yet reached American patients and consumers primarily because of regulatory and political obstacles rather than the limits of science.”

    The authors make a strong case for creating a regulatory pathway for commercialization of these beneficial biotechnologies. The Bio Report illustrates how the production of GE animals promises benefits for both biomedicine and agriculture. But Gottlieb and Wheeler agree that the science requires regulations that bridge the divide between food and biomedical products.

    I have written extensively about the importance of biotechnology in the Terry Etherton Blog on Biotechnology. The BIO Report, Genetically Engineered Animals and Public Health – Compelling Benefits for Health Care, Nutrition, the Environment and Animal Welfare, reinforces the need for and value of biotechnology in society. The numerous benefits of of GE animals only can be realized when policy obstacles are resolved that are limiting investment in this research and holding back product development.

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    2008-01-31 00:00:00: 2008-01-31 00:00:00:


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    2008-01-31 00:00:00: 2008-01-31 00:00:00:

    Terry D. Etherton

    Genetically engineered (GE) animals provide innovative technologies that can transform public health through biomedical, food and environmental applications, according to a scientific report released by the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO).

    The report, Genetically Engineered Animals and Public Health – Compelling Benefits for Health Care, Nutrition, the Environment and Animal Welfare, discusses how GE animals will enhance human health, food production, environmental protection, animal health and cutting-edge industrial applications. The report was authored by Scott Gottlieb, MD, of the American Enterprise Institute, and Matthew B. Wheeler, PhD, of the Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Gottlieb and Dr. Wheeler are experts in the field of genetic engineering of animals.

    Genetic engineering is the deliberate modification of the animal’s genome using the scientific tools of modern biotechnology. By incorporating genes from other organisms in a process called transgenesis, GE animals are being developed to address five broad goals:

  • Advance human health: GE animals will improve human health by producing novel replacement proteins, drugs, vaccines and tissues for the treatment and prevention of human disease.
  • Enhance food production and quality: Animals that are genetically engineered will have improved food production capabilities, enabling them to help meet the global demand for more efficient, higher quality and lower-cost sources of food.
  • Mitigate environmental impact: GE animals will contribute to improving the environment and human health by consuming fewer resources and producing less waste.
  • Optimize animal welfare. Genetic engineering offers tremendous benefits to the animals by enhancing the health, well-being and welfare of the animal itself.
  • Improve industrial products: Genetic engineering can produce high-value industrial products, such as spider silk, for both medical and defense applications.
  • “There are now dozens of products under development derived from genetically engineered animals that hold promise of benefit to human health,” says Dr. Gottlieb. “But the practical benefits of this technology have not yet reached American patients and consumers primarily because of regulatory and political obstacles rather than the limits of science.”

    The authors make a strong case for creating a regulatory pathway for commercialization of these beneficial biotechnologies. The Bio Report illustrates how the production of GE animals promises benefits for both biomedicine and agriculture. But Gottlieb and Wheeler agree that the science requires regulations that bridge the divide between food and biomedical products.

    I have written extensively about the importance of biotechnology in the Terry Etherton Blog on Biotechnology. The BIO Report, Genetically Engineered Animals and Public Health – Compelling Benefits for Health Care, Nutrition, the Environment and Animal Welfare, reinforces the need for and value of biotechnology in society. The numerous benefits of of GE animals only can be realized when policy obstacles are resolved that are limiting investment in this research and holding back product development.

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    2008-01-29 00:00:00: 2008-01-29 00:00:00:

    Socio-Economic Benefits Becoming Evident Among Resource-Poor Farmers

    MANILA, PHILIPPINES (Feb. 13, 2008) – After a dozen years of commercialization, biotech crops are still gaining ground with another year of double-digit growth, and new countries joining the list of supporters, according to a report released today by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA). In 2007, biotech crop area grew 12 percent or 12.3 million hectares to reach 114.3 million hectares, the second highest area increase in the past five years.In addition to planting more biotech hectares, farmers are quickly adopting varieties with more than one biotech trait. These “trait hectares” grew at a swift 22 percent, or 26 million hectares, to reach 143.7 million hectares – more than double the area increase of 12.3 million hectares. New crops were also added to the list as China reported 250,000 biotech poplar trees planted. The insect-resistant trees can contribute to reforestation efforts.

    Further, 2 million more farmers planted biotech crops last year to total 12 million farmers globally enjoying the advantages from the improved technology. Notably, 9 out of 10, or 11 million of the benefiting farmers, were resource-poor farmers, exceeding the 10-million milestone for the first time. In fact, the number of developing countries (12) planting biotech crops surpassed the number of industrialized countries (11), and the growth rate in the developing world was three times that of industrialized nations (21 percent compared to 6 percent.)

    “With increasing food prices globally, the benefits of biotech crops have never been more important,” said Clive James, chairman and founder of ISAAA and the report’s author. “Already those farmers who began adopting biotech crops a few years ago are beginning to see socio-economic advantages compared to their peers who haven’t adopted the crops. If we are to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of cutting hunger and poverty in half by 2015, biotech crops must play an even bigger role in the next decade.”

    According to the report, biotech crops have delivered unprecedented benefits that contribute toward the MDGs, particularly in countries like China, India and South Africa. The potential in the second decade of biotech crop commercialization (2006-2015) is enormous.

    Studies in India and China show Bt cotton has increased yields by up to 50 percent and 10 percent, respectively, and reduced insecticide use in both countries up to 50 percent or more. In India, growers increased income up to $250 or more per hectare, increasing farmer income nationally from $840 million to $1.7 billion last year. Chinese farmers saw similar gains with incomes growing an average of $220 per hectare, or more than $800 million nationally. Importantly, these studies showed strong farmer confidence in the crops with 9 of 10 Indian farmers replanting biotech cotton year on year, and 100 percent of Chinese farmers choosing to continue utilizing the technology.

    While these types of economic benefits are well substantiated, the socio-economic benefits associated with biotech crops are starting to emerge. A study of 9,300 Bt cotton and non-Bt cotton-growing households in India indicated that women and children in Bt cotton households have slightly more access to social benefits than non-Bt cotton growers. These include slight increases in pre-natal visits, assistance with at-home births, higher school enrollment for children and a higher proportion of children vaccinated.

    Rosalie Ellasus, a widowed mother of 3 children, found similar benefits, chosing farming as a way to support her family. “With the extra income generated from biotech maize, investing in farming made sense and allowed me to earn more than the medical technology field I was trained in,” she said. “The biotech maize gave me peace of mind and meant less time monitoring for pests. With stack corn, I also incur savings on cultivation and weeding costs. With the added income, I have been able to send all my children to college.”

    “It’s these types of benefits that will make crop biotechnology a vital tool in achieving the U.N. Millennium Development Goals of cutting hunger and poverty in half and ensuring a more sustainable agriculture in the future,” James said. “To reach these goals, a continued broadening and deepening of biotech crop use is crucial to meeting food, feed, fiber and fuel needs in the future.”

    In 2007, the United States, Argentina, Brazil, Canada, India and China continued to be the principal adopters of biotech crops globally. While the United States continues to be the largest user of the technology, its biotech crop area represents a declining share of the global area due to a broadening adoption. [Editor’s note: see ISAAA Country Fact Sheet for additional detail on specific countries.]

    “With a dozen years of accumulated knowledge and significant economic, environmental and socio-economic benefits, biotech crops are poised for even greater growth in coming years, particularly in developing countries that have the greatest need for this technology,” James said.

    According to the report, Burkina Faso, Egypt and possibly Vietnam are the next mostly likely countries to approve biotech crops. Australia is field-testing drought-tolerant wheat and two states recently lifted a four-year ban on biotech canola. Finally, countries like India recognize the importance of using biotechnology to make the country self-sufficient in food grains, including rice, wheat and oil seed production with the first biotech food crop, biotech eggplant, expecting approval in the near-term.

    “I predict the number of biotech countries, crops, traits, area and farmers will all grow substantially in the second decade of adoption,” James said. “More developing countries are likely to approve the technology as it’s now possible to design regulatory systems that are rigorous without being onerous given their limited resources. The current delay in timely approvals of biotech crops like golden rice with benefits for millions is a moral dilemma where the demands of regulatory systems have often become the end and not the means.”

    The report is entirely funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, a U.S.-based philanthropic organization associated with the Green Revolution; Ibercaja, one of the largest Spanish banks headquartered in the maize growing region of Spain; and the Bussolera-Branca Foundation from Italy, which supports the open-sharing of knowledge on biotech crops to aid decision-making by global society.

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